A Glug of Oil

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Fondant Potato Recipe

Fondant Potatoes - Gordon Ramsay Recipe

There are many different ways to cook potatoes, but fondant potatoes are special and are possibly my favourite of all potato dishes. 

The good news is, that they are much easier to make than you might think.

Fondant potatoes cooking in stock in a frying pan.

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Fondant potatoes are potatoes cooked in stock, crispy on the top, slightly chewy on the bottom and deliciously soft in the middle.

I've seen almost every MasterChef TV series has at least 2 chefs that make them on each and every show without fail!

Try something new and turn the humble potato into the chef's favourite, fondant potatoes.

Seasoned with thyme and cooking in butter and chicken stock (or you can use vegetable stock) fondant potatoes are perfect for any time, especially if you are trying to impress.

If you're entertaining or planning on cooking a special Valentine's day meal give these a go and you are bound to impress your guests or dinner date.

What are Fondant Potatoes?

Fondant potatoes, or Pommes fondant, is a method of preparing potatoes that traditionally involves cutting them into cylinders, browning the sides, and then slowly roasting them in butter and stock.

Fondant potatoes are a delicious change from an ordinary mash or boiled potato.

Serve with a nice fillet steak and you have the perfect Valentine's day meal for you and your partner.

Which Potato Variety Should I Use?

You will need a floury potato variety that won't go to mush whilst cooking and a Y-peeler is great for this as you can get a nice shape to the potatoes.

Floury potatoes have a fluffy, dry texture that makes great mash or chips. Key varieties include Desiree, Estima, King Edward and Maris Piper.

I used my Samuel Groves Ultimate Carbon Skillet Pan which is absolutely brilliant as it can go into the oven. If you don't have such a thing, you can just transfer the potatoes and stock to a small baking dish to finish cooking.

How to Make Fondant Potatoes

Peel the potatoes and slice the sides off to flatten.

The correct shape of a fondant potato

Peel into sort of barrel shapes (but with two flat sides). Now using the speed peeler or sharp knife, take the edge off all the way round - see the picture below.

Repeat on the other side of each potato. This will stop the edges from burning.

Season the potatoes and heat up a glug of oil in a frying pan just big enough to take both potatoes. If you use too big a pan you'll have to add more stock to come halfway up the potatoes.

When the oil is nice and hot, add the potatoes and cook for a couple of minutes before turning. They should be nicely coloured on one side and lightly browned on the other.

Fondant potatoes ready for the oven

Now make sure the more coloured side is facing up and add the thyme sprigs and the butter. Leave to cook for about 5 minutes over a medium/low heat.

The butter will foam nicely. Now you must add the chicken stock, carefully so you don't get splashed by the hot oil and butter.

Only add enough chicken stock so it only comes halfway up the potatoes.

Cover the frying pan and pop it into your preheated oven for about 20 to 25 minutes by which time they will have soaked up the lovely stock.

Make sure they're cooked through and serve straight away with whatever you fancy - a nice steak would be good.

To make 4 fondant potatoes, just add a little more stock so it comes halfway up the potatoes.

Fondant potatoes out of the oven

Make sure they're cooked through and served straight away.

What to Serve with Fondant Potatoes

With my Bacon Wrapped Chicken

With slices of Roast Beef, Roast Pork, Roast Lamb

Or with a nice Steak on a Date Night.

Have you tried this recipe? Please leave a ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ star rating in the recipe card below!

fondant potato recipe, how to make fondant potatoes, ways to cook potatoes
potatoes, entertaining, side, valentines
French
Yield: 2
Author: Jan Bennett
Fondant Potato Recipe

Fondant Potato Recipe

If you're entertaining or planning on cooking a special Valentines day meal give these a go and you are bound to impress your guests or dinner date.
Prep time: 10 MinCook time: 30 MinTotal time: 40 Min

Ingredients

Pre-heat your oven to 200C/400F or Gas 6
  • 2 good-sized potatoes floury (Maris Piper or King Edward)
  • 1 tablespoon of Olive oil
  • 40g knob of unsalted butter
  • a couple of sprigs of thyme
  • 200ml chicken stock - made from 1 Knorr chicken stock cube
  • black pepper to season
  • Plus a little sea salt if you really think they need it, just depends on the saltiness of the stock you use - my suggestion, is don't use OXO as they are too salty.

Instructions

  1. Peel the potatoes and slice the sides off to flatten. Peel into sort of barrel shapes (but with two flat sides).
  2. Now using the speed peeler or sharp knife, take the edge off all the way round - see the picture below.
  3. Repeat on the other side of each potato. This will stop the edges from burning.
  4. Season the potatoes and heat up a glug of oil in a frying pan just big enough to take both potatoes.
  5. When the oil is nice and hot, add the potatoes and cook for a couple of minutes before turning.
  6. They should be nicely coloured on one side and lightly browned on the other.
  7. Now make sure the more coloured side is facing up and add the thyme sprigs and the butter.
  8. Leave to cook for about 5 minutes over a medium/low heat. The butter will foam nicely.
  9. Add the chicken stock, carefully so you don't get splashed by the hot oil and butter.
  10. Only add enough chicken stock so it only comes halfway up the potatoes.
  11. Cover the frying pan and put it on the middle shelf of your preheated oven for about 20 to 25 minutes by which time they will have soaked up the lovely stock.
  12. Make sure they're cooked through and serve straight away with whatever you fancy; a nice steak would be good.
Did you make this recipe?
@aglugofoil #aglugofoil

9 comments

  1. I've always wanted to make these! They look excellent, Jan :)

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  2. I've never made, or indeed tried these. I've always thought they sound delicious, but I don't think I could bring myself to worry about shaping potatoes for cooking!! I think it's one of those things I will only try when eating out because I just don't have the patience!

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  3. I have never had fondant potatoes, but I would like to. I do love potatoes :)

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  4. Used to make these often when I cooked at the big house. Have not made them in a long time. Must rectify that and make some soon for the Toddster and myself. Yours look perfect Jan! Well done!

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  5. These look fab. Going to try them out this evening with pan fried sea bream, asparagus and beurre blanc sauce. How hot should the oven be?

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  6. Jo it does say in my recipe 200c 400f or gas 6 please let me know how they turned out. Your meal sounds delish!

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  7. Just made one of these as a tester for a meal I'm cooking during the week...and now can't wait...really tasty and so simple. Lack of patience needed to shape the potatoes is not an issue at all...most spuds are already barrel shaped and if you have a search around when buying, you can get similar shapes and sizes to ensure they cook at the same rate. Waiting for them to cool enough not to scorch the top of your mouth is the only patience really needed :-) Thank you!

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  8. Made these with this recipe many times now. Dead simple and look identical. It really is super easy to do. I leave my pan on the hob (I use a big caserole pot as it has a big base and put a lid on and simmer instead of using the oven. Gives you more pot/pan choices.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unknown thank you - a good tip I'll give that a go. Cheers

      Delete

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Cheers
Jan