Showing posts with label Indian. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Indian. Show all posts

Rogan Josh from Jamie's 30 Minute Meals


Last night I had a go at making one of Jamie's 30 Minute Meals from his latest book.  I made the vegetable Rogan Josh curry, with his Lemon Pickle and Carrot Salad
 
It can be done or so it seems - as you see Jamie do it on his Channel 4 television series to accompany his book.  However, in my tiny little kitchen, it is impossible.  The only reason I must point out is that I have to clear up as I go, or I'd seriously have no where to move.  An hour and 20 minutes later I was ready to serve!   
The only thing I added to this recipe was a tin of tomatoes and a pinch of dried chilli flakes.  I must say it really was a very tasty curry, but I personally felt it needed the tomatoes and extra chilli.
I think you'll agree it looks delicious.
Recipe taken from Jamie's book: 
Serves 4 to 6
You will need:
for the curry:
2 onions
1 medium butternut squash
1 small cauliflower
1 fresh red chilli (optional)
4 cloves of garlic
A bunch of fresh coriander
½ a 283g jar of Patak's Rogan Josh paste
1 x 400g tin of chickpeas - drained
**I added 1x400g tin of tomatoes and a pinch of dried chilli flakes
100g pre-washed baby spinach
1 x 500g tub of natural yogurt

For the rice:
1 mug of Basmati rice
A few whole cloves
For seasoning: Olive oil
Extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt and black pepper



How to do it:
Get all your ingredients and equipment ready. Fill and boil the kettle.
Curry: Peel and slice the onions and add to a large lidded frying pan with a splash of water and a few good lugs of olive oil. Carefully cut the butternut squash in half across the middle (for speed I’m only using the seedless neck), wrap up the base and put in the fridge for another day. Quarter the neck length-ways, then slice it into 1cm chunks – no need to peel them. Add to the pan. Trim the cauliflower and remove the outer leaves.
Cut it into bite-sized chunks, and throw them into the pan. If you want some extra heat, slice up the chilli and add it now.  Crush in the un-peeled garlic (I peeled mine).  Finely chop the coriander (stalks and all).  Reserve a few leaves for garnish and add the rest to the pan with a couple of generous splashes of boiled water.  Add the Rogan Josh paste and the tin of chickpeas. **At this point I added a tin of tomatoes and a pinch of dried chilli flakes.
Season and stir well, then put a lid on. Cook hard and fast, stirring occasionally.

Rice:  Put the mug of rice into a medium saucepan with a lug of olive oil and a few cloves, then cover with 2 mugs of boiled water (use the same mug you used for the rice). Add a pinch of salt, then put the lid on and boil on a medium heat for 7 minutes. 

Curry:  Check and add a splash of water if it looks a bit dry. Stir, then replace the lid.
Rice:  By now the 7 minutes should be up, so take the rice off the heat and leave it to sit with the lid on for 7 minutes. This will let it steam and will give you beautiful fluffy nutty rice.


Curry:  Take the lid off. Do you need to adjust the consistency at this point?  If so, you can add a generous splash of boiled water, depending on whether you want it drier or wetter.  Or mash up some of the veg for different textures. Taste and add a pinch of salt, if needed, then add the spinach and stir through.

To serve:  Tip half the tub of yogurt into a small bowl.  Drizzle over a little extra virgin olive oil and take to the table.  Transfer the rice and curry into large serving bowls.  Spoon the remaining yogurt over the curry, sprinkle with the rest of the coriander leaves and take both bowls to the table.
 
 
 The rice came out perfectly too.  Jamie's 30 Minute Meals really is a book worth buying.
8

Tandoori Style Chicken Skewers

A perfect starter to an Indian meal which is easy to make and looks amazing.

Marinading the chicken in the lime juice makes the chicken nice and tender.
15

Restaurant Style Chicken Balti

Balti is a curry with a tomato based sauce and this is my perfected recipe!
Balti restaurants are often known in Birmingham as 'Balti houses'. Balti houses have a reputation as being inexpensive places to eat.

This is because they commonly have no alcohol license, although customers who wish to drink are welcome to bring their own alcohol with them.

Restaurant Style Chicken Balti
   
You can use less chillies if you wish but what's the point of having curry if it isn't a bit hot is there? 

12

Coriander and Red Chilli Raita


Cooking an Indian dish tonight?
If so you must try this really easy to make Coriander and chilli raita.


Coriander and Red Chilli Raita
To make one small dish - will serve 2 to 4:
200ml TOTAL Greek yoghurt - don't get low fat stuff for this it won't be as nice
a small handful of fresh coriander - leaves only and chopped
1 red chilli of medium heat - seeded and finely chopped
1 spring onion - finely chopped
salt and black pepper to taste

How to do it:
Keep back a little chopped coriander and chilli to garnish.
In a small bowl, stir the yoghurt and add the coriander, chilli and spring onion. Stir, add tiny a bit of salt and some freshly ground black pepper - give it another stir and it's done!
If you're not going to use it straight away then cover with cling film and stick it in the fridge till later (use the same day though).
Top with the small amount of coriander and chilli you held back.
7

Jeera Rice or Cumin Rice

Jeera rice or cumin rice, whatever you want to call it, it's good.
Jeera means cumin in Hindi. The cumin seeds are gently roasted with cloves, cinnamon, peppercorns and bay leaves until they nicely browned and nutty.
This is another Gordon Ramsay recipe from his book 'Great Escape'

If you like Indian food than you have to give this a go!


Of course you don't eat the bay leaves nor the cinnamon stick - I left those in an attempt to make the picture look more fancy!

6

Indian Sambar - Gordon Ramsay

Sambar is a thin stew flavoured with tamarind and thickened with toor (tuvar) dal.
A plateful of loveliness!
So, this was another
recipe I just had to make from watching Gordon Ramsay's 'Great Escape' television programme.


I have to say this was the nicest Indian dish I have ever had. So many different flavours and very spicy but in the nicest possible way. The Jeera (cumin) rice was also delicious.
I will be making both again! Don't be put off my the never ending list of ingredients - this recipe is well worth the effort.



Print this Recipe
If you are going to make this, please note the following:
I must point out that Gordon's recipe doesn't mention adding water after adding the tamarind liquid. I had to add at least a cup if not a cup and a half.
The carrots and butternut can not possibly cook in just the little amount of thickish tamarind water and most definitely not in
only 8 to 10 minutes as his book says it will take.
When I make this again I will part boil the carro
ts and butternut before adding to the recipe.
I also used frozen okra from Tesco's as I couldn't get fresh on the day
I wanted it. I also go the tamarind (wet block) from Tesco
in their world food bit and the toor dal from an Asian grocers.

Serves 4

For the Masala you will need:
2 tsp fenugreek seeds
1 tbsp yellow split peas

2 tsp coriander seeds

6 curry leaves
4 dried red chillies




For the Sambar you will need:
200g toor dal
or it is also known as tuvar dal
6 curry leaves

100g tamarind pulp

2 tbsp vegetable oil
1 tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp fennel seeds

½ tsp cumin seeds

4 dried red chillies

1 medium aubergine, trimmed and cut into 2cm pieces
¼ butternut squash, peeled, de-seeded and cut into 2cm pieces

3 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 2cm pieces
at least a cup of water

1tsp ground turmeric

1tsp sea salt - or to taste

50g okra - washed, dried, trimmed and cut into bite sized pieces
4 tomatoes - skinned and chopped

1tsp ground coriander

1tsp red chilli powder
fresh coriander - leave only and chopped
1tbsp of ghee or melted unsalted butter



How to do it:
Place a frying pan over a medium heat and carefully roast all the ingredients for the masala.
When the spices begin to smell very fragrant and are nicely roasted, remove the pan from the heat and allow to cool completely.
Use a spice grinder or pestle and mortar to grind the spices into a powder.

Tip into a small bowl and add enough water, about 3-4 tablespoons, to form a thick paste with a slow-dropping consistency and set aside.


Put the toor dal and curry leaves into a medium saucepan and cover with 1½ litres of water. Bring to the boil and skim off any
scum that rises to the surface. Reduce the heat slightly and leave to simmer for 25-30 minutes or until the lentils are tender. Drain and set aside.

Soak the tamarind in 200ml of very hot water for 20 minutes, break down the block into smaller pieces.
Strain the mixture through a fine sieve pushing through as much as possible but discard the husks and seeds - you only want the thickish liquid.
Heat the vegetable oil in a large pan and add the mustard, fennel and cumin seeds and the dried chillies.




Cook for 1 minute or until the spices become very fragrant. Now add the aubergine, butternut squash and carrots, stirring well to coat the vegetables in the spices. After 2-3 minutes add the turmeric, salt and tamarind water to the pan and bring to the boil.
Boil for a good while until the vegetables are tender but not mushy. You will need to add water. I must have added at least a cup and a half by the time the carrots had softened - please see my note above.




Add the okra, cooked lentils, ground masala spice, chopped tomatoes, ground coriander and chilli powder to the pan and stir well.
Add more water to the pan if necessary. (The sambar should be quite thin in consistency.)

Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and leave to simmer for 5 minutes or so until the okra is just tender.
Taste and adjust the seasoning.

Just before serving, stir through the chopped coriander and ghee or butter.




Serve the Sambar hot with rice and warm naan bread.
I served mine with Jeera rice.
7

Indian Butter Chicken - Murgh Makhani Recipe

I've been watching Gordon Ramsay's 'Great Escape' on TV - a fantastic programme!  However, when the book was published I'm thinking something is wrong with the butter chicken recipe. In the programme talking about the butter chicken he had there, Gordon said "It doesn't taste tart - like it's been laced with tomato puree....it uses fresh tomatoes" 

Now, this is all very strange because the book says to use 275ml of tomato puree and there's not a mention of a tomato fresh or tinned!  That said, I must point out that in the USA tomato puree is known as tomato paste perhaps a misunderstanding by whoever wrote the book.

Indian Butter Chicken

So, there I was, everything ready to go until I noticed the amount of tomato puree. Not only would the dish have been very bitter, there would have been no sauce at all.
With all that in mind, I set about looking up different recipes on the net and the result is my 'titivated' version of Indian butter chicken.
14

Onion Fried Rice - Indian style

Onion fried rice with a nice hot curry - Mmm yum! Pictured here served with my Chicken Vindaloo.

Onion Fried Rice

There's no real recipe as I made it up, but all you need is some cooked cold rice enough for two and then just double the amount of spice and onions if you want to make rice for four etc.
Make sure your rice is cold or it will be sticky and be sure to read my note here on storing cooked rice safely.

5

The Best Chicken Vindaloo Recipe

Okay, as you know we do like a nice curry now and then!  I'm always trying different types of curry and messing about with recipes until now, at last, I have perfected Chicken Vindaloo.


 If you want an ordinary chicken curry, leave out the white wine vinegar.

18

Lemon Pickle - Jamie Oliver


An excellent pickle for serving with curry from Jamie Oliver's book 'Happy Days with the Naked Chef'

**If you're looking for the lemon pickle from Jamie's 30 Minute Meals, it can be found in my post here.


I used 'Barts' dried curry leaves.

You will need:
2 Teaspoons Mustard Seeds

2 Tablespoons Olive Oil

A Few Dried Curry leaves - broken
1 Teaspoon Yellow Mung Dal
1 Teaspoon Chilli Powder
4 Tablespoons White Wine Vinegar

2 Lemons


Method:
Wash and deseed the lemons and cut into bite size pieces, leaving the skin on.

Fry the mustard seeds in the hot oil. As they begin to pop add the curry leaves and the urad dal.
Lower the heat and cook until brown, then add the vinegar.

This bit is important! - Cook until the dal is soft - test one as they will be really hard if not cooked through.
Stir in the lemon, cook for a bit and then remove from the heat and allow to cool. This can be stored in the fridge for a few days if you wish.
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A GLUG OF OIL